You Are Enough, Stop Criticising Yourself (especially during these unforeseen times)

You Are Enough, Stop Criticising Yourself (especially during these unforeseen times)

Am I doing enough? Am I doing too much? Am I being overdramatic? Am I too calm? Am I being lazy? Everyone’s working out… should I be working out?

I’ve said it before, your mind can be a bully and overthinking can be a terrible result of it’s unkindness.

Working on yourself is healthy and helpful, HOWEVER, crossing the line and taking it too far can be harmful! During this unforeseen and hugely difficult global circumstance, the free-time many of us have may allow your overthinking tendencies to increase and those with mental health issues may be struggling.

Humans love to compare. It’s in our nature. This attribute of mankind has been evident during the extraordinary times in lockdown but here is a reminder to make healthiness (physical & mental) your priority.


Generally, everyone has unique approaches to how they spend their time. We all have different interests and lifestyles, working on things in our own personal schedules. Similarly now during this pandemic, everyone is approaching these times in their own ways… and that is valid!

Key workers are busy, sacrificing themselves to save lives. Most others are on lockdown (UK) and this dramatic lifestyle change means some people are exercising, some are quizzing, many are baking and lots are chilling. As long as you are following governmental guidelines, you’re already doing one thing right!

Obviously I can’t address the entire population but here are some short affirmations.

  • Don’t feel guilty for sleeping in. If your body tells you to rest, you should! This is potentially your first opportunity to relax for days straight without work/school/commitments stopping you.
  • On the other hand, there’s obviously nothing wrong with wanting to wake up early. Spend your days however you like!
  • You may feel helpless, like you should be doing more to help. Remember, by staying at home, you are helping. There are other ways you can help from home such as volunteering or donating to local hospitals, charities or businesses if you have the money.
  • Don’t be hard on yourself if your motivation has plumetted, it is entirely normal when your schedule and surroundings change.
  • Don’t criticise yourself if you’re not doing as much exercise as others you see on social media. Although staying healthy is great, it’t not a competition. Set your own goals rather than comparing your routine with others.

Things you could do when feeling negative about yourself:

  • Write a list of things you achieve each day, be it small or big tasks
  • Start up a self love scheme or journal
  • Call a friend or family member as a reminder that you are loved

Due to the sensitivity and complexity of today’s topic, I probably rambled in this post but hopefully I managed to convey the message to prioritise looking after yourself as well as one another.

Lots of love,

Grace x

My Advice for Year 12 Students

My Advice for Year 12 Students

As a Year 13 student myself (not really anymore because of coronavirus), I would love to provide some tips and advice regarding the last year of school education.

I understand that this situation may be daunting for year 12s who may worry they are missing academic time which could be detrimental to their exams next year.

If you’re in that position or know somebody who is, hopefully this post will help. I’m neither an A* student or an expert but I’ll cover topics such as revision tips, exam anxiety, studying at home and balancing life and revision.

#1 MOTIVATING YOURSELF TO REVISE (AND WORK FROM HOME WITHOUT A TEACHER)

You sit in your room and there are probably hundreds of things you’d prefer to do instead of revision. I get it, motivating yourself to revise can often feel impossible, however, when the exam date nears, your stress will be reduced and confidence in the subject will be increased if you revise. Three motivation methods:

  • Think about how you want to feel on results day. For me, I had a dream university and set of grades I desired… imagining results day and potentially not getting into university really inspired me to revise on days where I had little motivation.
  • Reward yourself. Set goals and when you achieve them, give yourself a reward i.e. have your favourite snack after 40 minutes of revision. This should strengthen your self control and motivate you to get things done.
  • Create a desirable revision space. I doubt you will feel inspired to revise if your desk looks like a bomb site. Create a place to revise that you feel relaxed and satisfied by. I tried to keep my desk tidy so that when I came home from school I could motivate myself to continue with some work.

#2 FINDING THE RIGHT REVISION TECHNIQUE

Everybody has their own ways of revising therefore I wouldn’t force a technique upon anyone but research has shown that testing yourself regularly is a great revision method to ensure information goes into your long term memory.

Try out different ways of revising and find which one was best for you personally. Here’s a brief list of methods to attempt:

  • Revision cards (question on one side, answer on the other)
  • Past papers and practice questions
  • Quizlet online tests
  • Watching videos on the topic
  • Recording yourself talking about the topic
  • Teaching information to a friend
  • Key word practice
  • Make your own PowerPoint presentations
  • Stick post it notes around your house or in your room

For me, revision cards were the best for me because I would make them as soon as I covered the information in class and then could always come back to them as a quick way of recalling the information. I sometimes took them on long journeys with me or up to bed the night before exams to refresh my knowledge. Finding the effort to do entire practice papers was difficult but doing them is a really effective method because realistically, it aids the skills you’ll need in the actual exam.

#3 TACKLING EXAM ANXIETY

I’m a naturally very anxious person and I found exams very stressful throughout my time at school so my advice may not be perfect despite coming from experience. I would literally get anxious about getting anxious and it became a vicious cycle. Infact, I had to sit my GCSE exams in a separate room because my anxiety would make me feel physically ill to point where my vision was blurred and I struggled to read the questions through the dizziness.

In Year 13 however, I really tried to work on this, researching methods to ensure I could go into the exam hall and sit the exam with all my attention on the question paper rather than anything else.

Things to consider if you get anxious about exams:

  • Your feelings are common, don’t be hard on yourself.
  • Breathing exercises before you enter the exam hall can distract your brain from it’s panicked state and they help focus on relaxing yourself instead.
  • There is somebody you can talk to if it becomes too overwhelming to deal with alone. Perhaps a parent, sibling, teacher or friend.
  • Take a bottle of water into the exam hall.
  • If you’re anxious the night before, fragrances such as lavender aid sleep and should make you feel calm.

Please speak to a professional if you get extreme anxiety. Speaking up is the best thing you can do!

FINALLY, #4 PREPARING TO ENTER YEAR 13

Enjoy your Summer break as much as you can. Realistically, you aren’t going to want to revise everyday during your break, nor would that be good for you. Don’t put unnecessary pressure on yourself.

Perhaps look into what you’ll study next academic year and read ahead on some books or just key words.

Find a balance between work and social life with a timetable or just loosely planning ahead.

Introduction

Introduction

In the midst of the daunting, overwhelming and somewhat stressful environment of the internet, I decided to create a blog to serve as a form of positive and productive escapism…hence the name.

Hopefully, through this blog, I can provide entertainment, inspiration, reviews and advice for others, covering light topics such as fashion, lifestyle and travel in addition to important discussions about mental health, discrimination, social controversies and more. Hopefully there’s something for everyone!

My name is Grace and I was expecting to take my A Levels (in Philosophy, English and Psychology) this year, however, for obvious reasons they have been cancelled. Thankfully, I’m still going to university this September. Finding a balance between academics and a social life can be a struggle, however, I strongly believe having a break from work and enjoying other hobbies and interests is incredibly beneficial. As a student myself, perhaps this blog could help others who often feel trapped, stressed and anxious about their workload, future or life in general.

As cringeworthy as it sounds, you’re never alone in your mentality, even if it often feels that way. Having somebody to relate or talk to can lift a weight off your shoulders. Ideally, I’d love my blog to be a catalyst for open conversations and a support network for anyone that needs it.

So, welcome to my blog, thank you for reading and I hope you visit soon.

Grace x